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  1. #1
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    Toothing Plane: a good tutorial in photos

    A toothing plane is something I imagine not too many find a use for in their shop. Its a good tool for some things and it might be useful to someone who is not aware of a tool like this. Rather than go on about it, here's site below that explains its use and gives you some ideas.

    https://anthonyhaycabinetmaker.wordp...l-of-our-time/

    Now I know you might think this is not a tool for me with all the power available today. Think again. If you have experienced tear out at the wrong time, this could be the tool for you.

    take a look

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  3. #2
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    Re: Toothing Plane: a good tutorial in photos

    Dan,
    You are a "one-man teaching machine!"
    “Think about it: Everything with a power cord eventually winds up in the trash.” John Sarge, timber framer and blacksmith instructor

  4. #3
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    Re: Toothing Plane: a good tutorial in photos

    Thank you Dan.

    I have a toothed blade for my Lee Valley low angle bevel up Jack plane, and have found it useful leveling knots and squirely grain. That said, the toothed blade came with about a 37 degree bevel (giving a 49 degree angle of attack.) After reading the article, I may regrind the bevel to closer to 50 degrees to give about a 62 degree bevel because at times I have gotten a little tear out in walnut and oak. I think that would put it closer to what the original designs were.

    Also had never given a thought to using it for profiling a glue surface.

    Go
    Practicing at practical woodworking

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    Re: Toothing Plane: a good tutorial in photos

    I was working at (okay - struggling with) smoothing some very highly figured walnut for a door panel; I found a close cousin to the plane shown in the article at Ed's antique tool store in Pittsboro, and it worked GREAT on the highly figured walnut.

    I've also read that some folks are using these planes to finish the tops of their workbenches to make them less slippery - but I haven't tried that yet...

    Andrew

  6. #5
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    Re: Toothing Plane: a good tutorial in photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Gofor View Post
    Thank you Dan.

    I have a toothed blade for my Lee Valley low angle bevel up Jack plane, and have found it useful leveling knots and squirely grain. That said, the toothed blade came with about a 37 degree bevel (giving a 49 degree angle of attack.) After reading the article, I may regrind the bevel to closer to 50 degrees to give about a 62 degree bevel because at times I have gotten a little tear out in walnut and oak. I think that would put it closer to what the original designs were.

    Also had never given a thought to using it for profiling a glue surface.

    Go

    Mark this is the LN low angle jack that's pretty similar to the Veritas Jack. I love this plane. Since I bought this plane around 5 years back, I have not used my other bevel down planes too much. With the plane I bought used, I got a toothing blade, high angle blade and a standard grind.

    Working with the plane and a toothing blade you have tremendous power in the stroke. As you steepen the angle, the pushing gets just a tiny bit tougher. Nothing like the drag you feel when you go from a 45 degree angle to 50-55 degree angle on a straight blade. You have to give up something to get the safety of the higher angle. In addition to the angles you can test on a bevel up plane the adjustable mouth opening is another bonus. The low angle jack is just a fantastic tool. If mine broke in pieces today, I would be ordering another tomorrow.




    On the same line of thinking about leveling surfaces for different tasks, I think the shorter body low angle smoothers are something I would put to use with the work I do. In many cases the Jack is too long and I spend a little too much time getting the entire surface flat when I only need to smooth out a small area. If I had some wavy spots when viewed from a certain angle - that's OK with me.

    The plane below is on my radar screen. I'm looking for a used one but I don't see them as frequently as the Jack.





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