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    Gloss over Danish Oil

    I am finishing a walnut bench that I have applied two coats of Watco Danish Oil (Dark walnut) to. It does not have much of a shine (Actually hardly any) Can I apply polycrylic over the danish oil without any issues? If not polycrylic what would you recommend. And how long should I wait after applying the Watco danish oil before applying the topcoat.

    Chris

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    Re: Gloss over Danish Oil

    Watco oil is a blend of varnish and linseed oil. If you want gloss you can continue to build up the Watco oil finish, I find that four coats starts to have some sheen. You could buff with paste wax. Or you can use a gloss spar varnish. Polyurathane would also work, but if you had to repair it later the featheredge where you sand out the repair would show. With oil or spar varnish repairs blend in much better.

    It all depends on the final look you are after and what you are comfortable doing.


    Oil usually takes at least a week to dry well enough to top coat.


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    Re: Gloss over Danish Oil

    In general, oil/varnish finishes aren't really meant to have a high sheen, but instead have that "in the wood" finish and feel. 2 coats are all that is necessary (as per manufacturers' recommendations). Any buildup in the sheen is not the oil, but just more varnish coating. It's much quicker and economical to either buff with wax or switch over to a varnish.

    Let it dry for at least 3 days, but closer to a week is probably better. It should just barely smell like linseed oil if at all once it's dry. Next, it depends on the look your after (here I'd highly recommend a test piece for comparison that has the same 2 coats of Danish oil). Like Mike said I'd try:
    1) Buff with paste wax which will be a soft finish with a nice luster.
    2) Although polycrylic should be fine, I'd tend to stay on the oil side and use a wiping varnish like thinned polyurethane (50/50 gloss polyurethane/ mineral spirits). You could always try a test piece and see how the polycrylic performs as well. Lots of premixed versions of wiping varnish out there as well. See the Howard Acheson's post for application:
    http://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/s...ight=wipe+poly

    To repair: Wax can be removed with mineral spirits and then reapplied. A varnish needs to be stripped (chemical or sanding) but is much more protective.

    Note that Danish oil is usually mostly mineral spirits (~50%) with some raw linseed oil and a little varnish. Raw linseed oil takes much longer to cure than boiled linseed oil (3d vs. 1d in optimum conditions). A homebrew recipe for oil/varnish is 1/3,1/3,1/3 boiled linseed oil (BLO): mineral spirits: varnish (polyurethane or other). apply like danish oil except it dries a bit faster. then buff with wax or topcoat with varnish. Alternatively, if you want the oil look and varnish sheen/feel/protection, you can simply coat with blo, let dry, then topcoat with varnish. Oh the possibilities...

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    Re: Gloss over Danish Oil

    As already said, oil/varnish finishes like Watco do not result in a high gloss. They are in-the-wood finishes the leave a sort of soft sheen.

    You can overcoat Watco with a waterborne acrylic like Polycrylic but you must allow the Watco to fully dry. This means to give it at least 7-10 days. It may seem dry earlier but because of the deep absorption of the oils, the oxygen necessary for continued curing must not be impeded by a relatively air impervious finish like waterborne acrylic.

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    Re: Gloss over Danish Oil

    Quote Originally Posted by ck1999 View Post
    I am finishing a walnut bench that I have applied two coats of Watco Danish Oil (Dark walnut) to. It does not have much of a shine (Actually hardly any) Can I apply polycrylic over the danish oil without any issues? If not polycrylic what would you recommend. And how long should I wait after applying the Watco danish oil before applying the topcoat.
    Have you finished the finish? (credit Bob Flexner)

    I was able to get a medium-high gloss on maple by building a few layers of oil/varnish, letting it cure for a week or so, and then wet-sanding (again with the oil/varnish) up through 600 grit. Go higher for a higher gloss.
    Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time.

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    Re: Gloss over Danish Oil

    Quote Originally Posted by merrill77 View Post
    Have you finished the finish? (credit Bob Flexner)

    I was able to get a medium-high gloss on maple by building a few layers of oil/varnish, letting it cure for a week or so, and then wet-sanding (again with the oil/varnish) up through 600 grit. Go higher for a higher gloss.
    good point!
    would you consider this burnishing the wood rather than the finish? with the end result being the same
    You can't milk a cow with your hands in your pants.

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    Re: Gloss over Danish Oil

    If you check in your copy of Flexner, you will find that he discourages trying to "build" and oil/varnish finish. Oil/varnish finishes contain so much oil that they are not absorbed very must after the initial application. The high oil content also means the too many coats leaves a gummy, soft finish.

    Oil/varnish mixture finishes are intended to be an in-the-wood finish. The varnish component effectively seals the pores and the surface preventing subsequent application from being absorbed.

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    Re: Gloss over Danish Oil

    Quote Originally Posted by bluedawg76 View Post
    good point!
    would you consider this burnishing the wood rather than the finish? with the end result being the same
    IMO, no. An oil/varnish finish still builds a surface coat, albeit very slowly compared to straight varnish. So it is about leveling and polishing the finish to a higher sheen. I'm certainly no expert in finishing, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Acheson View Post
    If you check in your copy of Flexner, you will find that he discourages trying to "build" and oil/varnish finish. Oil/varnish finishes contain so much oil that they are not absorbed very must after the initial application. The high oil content also means the too many coats leaves a gummy, soft finish.

    Oil/varnish mixture finishes are intended to be an in-the-wood finish. The varnish component effectively seals the pores and the surface preventing subsequent application from being absorbed.
    It certainly doesn't build enough of a surface coat to fill the pores on oak, for example (I've tried that). But on a well prepped surface without substantial pores to fill, it seems to build just enough. In my case, the surface was maple and was prepped with a scraper, not sandpaper. I sealed with a coat of 2-3lb shellac, applied a few coats of the oil/varnish, then wet sanded a week or so later. I got a reasonable sheen on it - not a high gloss, but enough to see a reflection in the surface.
    Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time.

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    Re: Gloss over Danish Oil

    I ended up getting some spray can lacquer. I applied about 4 coats to the entire bench and about 7 to the top. I may try and apply more later. I sanded after a few coats (400 grit). The lacquer did add gloss and made it look better.





    Thanks for the help.

    Chris

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    Re: Gloss over Danish Oil

    Nicely done. It looks good.








    Quote Originally Posted by ck1999 View Post
    I ended up getting some spray can lacquer. I applied about 4 coats to the entire bench and about 7 to the top. I may try and apply more later. I sanded after a few coats (400 grit). The lacquer did add gloss and made it look better.





    Thanks for the help.

    Chris

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